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eggsThe British Egg Information Service’s plan to resurrect their fifty year-old advice to “go to work on an egg” has been stopped by the Broadcast Advertising Clearance Centre. It seems suggesting eating an egg everyday for breakfast breaks Ofcom advertisement rules on promoting a varied diet.

Offers by the British Egg Information Service to add a line to the original adverts saying that eggs should be eaten as part of a varied diet were rejected. The Broadcast Advertising Clearance Centre defended their decision by explaining eating an egg a day wouldn’t cause any harm, but that it "should be served with fruit juice or toast".

I may be a confirmed Marmite-toast breakfast eater, but I’ve nothing against those who need their five-minute boiled egg every morning. Banning the re-run of the ads strikes me as a lost opportunity. Surely it’s better to promote eating any type of breakfast at all in an age where many go to work on just a coffee.

If you want to see what all the fuss is about visit Go to work on an egg and watch the great Brummy comedian Tony Hancock in eight of his original series of advertisements for the then British Egg Marketing Board.

Hancock

Fume BlancMatching Mondavi Fumé Blanc with a plate of battered haddock, hash browns, onion rings and some token peas proved a good choice – an evening filled with guzzling and munching followed. The glossy-green of Mondavi’s Sauvignon Blanc Fumé matched the treacle tones of the battered meal and awakened the signals from eye to stomach. A hard choice followed - drink or eat?

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rhubarbBolting rhubarb is not a good sign. The twenty year-old rhubarb patch in my neighbour’s allotment is showing all the evidence of being old and tired. Flower-heads are produced when a plant feels its life is threatened – a lack of water or nearing the end of its productive life are the most common reasons. But this is not a time to be down-hearted.

The hazelnut meringue came with embarrassed apologies. It was late and Michael, the chef at The Poolway House Hotel in Coleford, was reluctant to let such a cracked and crumbled meringue leave the kitchen.